GATE 2017

Graduate Aptitude Test in Engineering (GATE) is an all India examination that primarily tests the comprehensive understanding of various undergraduate subjects in Engineering/ Technology / Architecture and post-graduate level subjects in Science. The GATE score of a candidate reflects a relative performance level in a particular subject in the exam across several years. The score is used for admissions to post-graduate programs (e.g., M.E., M.Tech, direct Ph.D.) in Indian institutes of higher education with financial assistance provided by MHRD and other Government agencies. The score may also be used by Public and Private Sector Undertakings for employment screening purposes.

About GATE Exam

Graduate Aptitude Test in Engineering (GATE) is an all India examination that primarily tests the comprehensive understanding of various undergraduate subjects in Engineering/ Technology / Architecture and post-graduate level subjects in Science. The GATE score of a candidate reflects a relative performance level in a particular subject in the exam across several years. The score is used for admissions to post-graduate programs (e.g., M.E., M.Tech, direct Ph.D.) in Indian institutes of higher education with financial assistance provided by MHRD and other Government agencies. The score may also be used by Public and Private Sector Undertakings for employment screening purposes. The Indian Institute of Science (IISc) and seven Indian Institutes of Technology (IITs at Bombay, Delhi, Guwahati, Kanpur, Kharagpur, Madras and Roorkee) jointly administer the conduct of GATE. The operations related to GATE in each of the 8 zones are managed by a zonal GATE Office at the IITs or IISc on behalf of the National Coordination Board (NCB)-GATE, Department of Higher Education, Ministry of Human Resource Development (MHRD), and Government of India. The GATE committee, which comprises of representatives from these administering institutes, is the sole authority for regulating the examination and declaring the results. The Organizing Institute (OI) is responsible for the end-to-end process and coordination amongst the administering Institutes. The Organizing Institute for GATE 2015 was IIT Kanpur. Management institutes like NITIE, Mumbai offer admission to Post Graduate Diploma in Industrial Engineering on the basis of GATE score.

Several public sector undertaking has, in the past, used GATE scores for screening for providing a salaried employment. A select few such organizations are: Indian Oil Corporation Limited, National Thermal Power Corporation, Power Grid India, etc. But, GATE administration is not responsible for employment opportunities. The qualified candidates must check newspapers and other reliable sources for any such information.

The eligible candidate with a valid GATE score also receives the financial assistance during Master’s programs and direct Doctoral programs in Engineering/Technology/Architecture, and Doctoral programs in relevant branches of Science in Institutes supported by the MHRD or other Government agencies. As per the directives of the MHRD, the following procedure is to be adopted for admission to the post-graduate programs (Master’s and Doctoral) with MHRD scholarship/assistantship. Depending upon the norms adopted by a specific institute or department of the Institute, a candidate may be admitted directly into a course based on his/her performance in GATE only or based on his/her performance in GATE and an admission test/interview conducted by the department to which he/she has applied and/or the candidate’s academic record. If the candidate is to be selected through test/interview for post- graduate programs, a minimum of 70% weightage will be given to the performance in GATE and the remaining 30% weightage will be given to the candidate’s performance in test/interview and/or academic record, as per MHRD guidelines.

The admitting institutes could however prescribe a minimum passing percentage of marks in the test/interview. Some colleges/institutes specify GATE qualification as the mandatory requirement even for admission without MHRD scholarship/assistantship. To avail of the financial assistance (scholarship), the candidate must first admission to a program in these Institutes, by a procedure that could vary from institute to institute. Qualification in GATE is also a minimum requirement to apply for various fellowships awarded by many Government organizations. Candidates are advised to seek complete details of admission procedures and availability of MHRD scholarship/assistantship from the concerned admitting institution. The criteria for postgraduate admission with scholarship/assistantship could be different for different institutions. The management of the post-graduate scholarship/assistantship is also the responsibility of the admitting institution. Similarly, reservation of seats under different categories is as per the policies and norms prevailing at the admitting institution and Government of India rules. GATE offices will not entertain any enquiry about admission, reservation of seats and/or award of scholarship/assistantship.

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Eligibility Criteria for GATE

Minimum Eligibility Criteria for GATE 2016

Qualifying Degree

Qualifying Degree/Examination (Descriptive)

Description of Eligible candidates

Year of Qualification cannot be later than

B.E./B.Tech./ B.Pharm.

Bachelor's degree holders in Engineering/ Technology  (4 years after 10+2 or 3 years after Diploma in Engineering/Technology) and those who are in the final year of such programs.

Currently in the final year or already completed

2016

B. Arch.

Bachelor's degree holders of Architecture (Five years course)

Currently in the final year or already completed

2016

B.Sc. (Research) / B.S.

Bachelor's degree in Science(Post-Diploma/4 years after 10+2)

Currently in the 4th year or already completed

2016

M. Sc./M.A./MCA or equivalent

Master's degree in any branch of Science/Mathematics / Statistics / Computer Applications or equivalent

Currently in the final year or already completed

2016

Int. M.E / M.Tech (Post-B.Sc.)

Post-BSc Integrated Master's degree programs in Engineering / Technology (Four year program)

Currently in the 2nd/3rd/4th year or already completed

2018

Int. M.E./ M.Tech or Dual Degree (after Diploma or 10+2)

Integrated Master's degree program or Dual Degree program in Engineering / Technology (Five year program)

Currently in the 4th/5th year or already completed

2017

Int. M.Sc/ Int. B.S.-M.S.

Integrated M.Sc. or Five year integrated B.S.-M.S. program

Currently in the final year or already completed

2016

Professional Society Examinations     (equivalent to B.E./B.Tech./B.Arch.)

B.E./B.Tech./B.Arch. equivalent examinations, of Professional Societies, recognized by MHRD/UPSC/AICTE (e.g., AMIE by Institution of Engineers-India, AMICE by the Institute of Civil Engineers-India)

Completed section A or equivalent of such professional courses

NA

NOTE: If a candidate is pursuing any higher degree or already obtained a degree higher than that mentioned in the above table, then the candidate can select the relevant minimum required qualifying degree while filling the application form.

In case a candidate has passed one of the qualifying examinations as mentioned above in 2015 or earlier, he/she has to submit the degree certificate / provisional certificate / course completion certificate / professional certificate / membership certificate issued by the society or institute. In case, the candidate is expected to complete one of the qualifying criteria in 2016 or later as mentioned above, he/she has to submit a certificate from Principal or a copy of marks card for section A of AMIE.

(i) Candidates who have appeared in the final semester/year exam in 2015, but with a backlog (arrears/failed subjects) in any of the papers in their qualifying degree should submit a copy of any one of the marks sheets of the final year

(ii) have to obtain a signature from their Principal/HOD along with the seal on the “Certificate from the Principal” format that will be printed on the application PDF file which will be generated after completion of the online application submission.

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GATE Exam Pattern

The GATE examination consists of a single online paper of 3-hour duration, in which there will be a total of 65 questions carrying 100 marks.

Section Weightage & Marks

70% of the total marks is given to the technical section while 15% weightage is given to General Aptitude and Engineering Maths.

Weightage

Questions (Total 65)

 

Respective Engineering Branch

70 Marks

25 - 1 mark questions 30 - 2 mark questions

Engineering Maths

15 Marks

General Aptitude

15 Marks

Five 1 mark questions Five 2 mark questions

For 1-mark multiple-choice questions, 1/3 marks will be deducted for a wrong answer. Likewise, for 2-mark multiple-choice questions, 2/3 marks will be deducted for a wrong answer. There is no negative marking for numerical answer type questions. 

Question Types: 

(i) Multiple Choice Questions (MCQ) carrying 1 or 2 marks each in all papers and sections. These questions are objective in nature, and each will have a choice of four answers, out of which the candidate has to mark the correct answer(s).

(ii) Numerical Answer/Fill in the blank Questions of 1 or 2 marks each in all papers and sections. For numerical answer questions, choices will not be given. Candidates have to enter the answer (which will be a real number, signed or unsigned, e.g. 25.06, -25.06, 25, -25 etc.) using a virtual keypad. An appropriate range will be considered while evaluating the numerical answer type questions so that the candidate is not penalized due to the usual round-off errors. Design of Questions  

The Fill in the Blank Questions usually consist of 35% - 40% of the total weightage.

The questions in a paper may be designed to test the following abilities:

(i) Recall:

These are based on facts, principles, formulae or laws of the discipline of the paper. The candidate is expected to be able to obtain the answer either from his/her memory of the subject or at most from a one-line computation.

(ii) Comprehension:

These questions will test the candidate’s understanding of the basics of his/her field, by requiring him/her to draw simple conclusions from fundamental ideas.  

(iii) Application:

In these questions, the candidate is expected to apply his/her knowledge either through computation or by logical reasoning.

(iv) Analysis and Synthesis: 

In these questions, the candidate is presented with data, diagrams, images etc. that require analysis before a question can be answered. A Synthesisquestion might require the candidate to compare two or more pieces of information. Questions in this category could, for example, involve candidates in recognising unstated assumptions, or separating useful information from irrelevant information.

About Online pattern

The examination for all the papers will be carried out in an ONLINE Computer Based Test (CBT) mode where the candidates will be shown the question s in a random sequence on a computer screen. The candidates are required to either select the answer (for MCQ type) or enter the answer for numerical answer type question using a mouse on a virtual keyboard (keyboard of the computer will be disabled). The candidates will also be allowed to use a calculator with which the online portal is equipped with.

Syllabus

Electronics and Communications (EC)

Section 1: Engineering Mathematics Linear Algebra: Vector space, basis, linear dependence and independence, matrix algebra, eigen values and eigen vectors, rank, solution of linear equations – existence and uniqueness.

Calculus: Mean value theorems, theorems of integral calculus, evaluation of definite and improper integrals, partial derivatives, maxima and minima, multiple integrals, line, surface and volume integrals, Taylor series.

Differential Equations: First order equations (linear and nonlinear), higher order linear differential equations, Cauchy's and Euler's equations, methods of solution using variation of parameters, complementary function and particular integral, partial differential equations, variable separable method, initial and boundary value problems.

Vector Analysis: Vectors in plane and space, vector operations, gradient, divergence and curl, Gauss's, Green's and Stoke's theorems. Complex Analysis: Analytic functions, Cauchy's integral theorem, Cauchy's integral formula; Taylor's and Laurent's series, residue theorem. Numerical Methods: Solution of nonlinear equations, single and multi-step methods for differential equations, convergence criteria.

Probability and Statistics: Mean, median, mode and standard deviation; combinatorial probability, probability distribution functions - binomial, Poisson, exponential and normal; Joint and conditional probability; Correlation and regression analysis.

Section 2: Networks, Signals and Systems Network solution methods: nodal and mesh analysis; Network theorems: superposition, Thevenin and Norton’s, maximum power transfer; Wye‐Delta transformation; Steady state sinusoidal analysis using phasors; Time domain analysis of simple linear circuits; Solution of network equations using Laplace transform; Frequency domain analysis of RLC circuits; Linear 2‐port network parameters: driving point and transfer functions; State equations for networks.

Continuous-time signals: Fourier series and Fourier transform representations, sampling theorem and applications; Discrete-time signals: discrete-time Fourier transform (DTFT), DFT, FFT, Z-transform, interpolation of discrete-time signals; LTI systems: definition and properties, causality, stability, impulse response, convolution, poles and zeros, parallel and cascade structure, frequency response, group delay, phase delay, digital filter design techniques.

Section 3: Electronic Devices Energy bands in intrinsic and extrinsic silicon; Carrier transport: diffusion current, drift current, mobility and resistivity; Generation and recombination of carriers; Poisson and continuity equations; P-N junction, Zener diode, BJT, MOS capacitor, MOSFET, LED, photo diode and solar cell; Integrated circuit fabrication process: oxidation, diffusion, ion implantation, photolithography and twin-tub CMOS process.

Section 4: Analog Circuits Small signal equivalent circuits of diodes, BJTs and MOSFETs; Simple diode circuits: clipping, clamping and rectifiers; Single-stage BJT and MOSFET amplifiers: biasing, bias stability, mid-frequency small signal analysis and frequency response; BJT and MOSFET amplifiers: multi-stage, differential, feedback, power and operational; Simple op-amp circuits; Active filters; Sinusoidal oscillators: criterion for oscillation, single-transistor and opamp configurations; Function generators, wave-shaping circuits and 555 timers; Voltage reference circuits; Power supplies: ripple removal and regulation.

Section 5: Digital Circuits Number systems; Combinatorial circuits: Boolean algebra, minimization of functions using Boolean identities and Karnaugh map, logic gates and their static CMOS implementations, arithmetic circuits, code converters, multiplexers, decoders and PLAs; Sequential circuits: latches and flip‐flops, counters, shift‐registers and finite state machines; Data converters: sample and hold circuits, ADCs and DACs; Semiconductor memories: ROM, SRAM, DRAM; 8-bit microprocessor (8085): architecture, programming, memory and I/O interfacing.

Section 6: Control Systems Basic control system components; Feedback principle; Transfer function; Block diagram representation; Signal flow graph; Transient and steady-state analysis of LTI systems; Frequency response; Routh-Hurwitz and Nyquist stability criteria; Bode and root-locus plots; Lag, lead and lag-lead compensation; State variable model and solution of state equation of LTI systems.

Section 7: Communications Random processes: autocorrelation and power spectral density, properties of white noise, filtering of random signals through LTI systems; Analog communications: amplitude modulation and demodulation, angle modulation and demodulation, spectra of AM and FM, superheterodyne receivers, circuits for analog communications; Information theory: entropy, mutual information and channel capacity theorem; Digital communications: PCM, DPCM, digital modulation schemes, amplitude, phase and frequency shift keying (ASK, PSK, FSK), QAM, MAP and ML decoding, matched filter receiver, calculation of bandwidth, SNR and BER for digital modulation; Fundamentals of error correction, Hamming codes; Timing and frequency synchronization, inter-symbol interference and its mitigation; Basics of TDMA, FDMA and CDMA.

Section 8: Electromagnetics Electrostatics; Maxwell’s equations: differential and integral forms and their interpretation, boundary conditions, wave equation, Poynting vector; Plane waves and properties: reflection and refraction, polarization, phase and group velocity, propagation through various media, skin depth; Transmission lines: equations, characteristic impedance, impedance matching, impedance transformation, S-parameters, Smith chart; Waveguides: modes, boundary conditions, cut-off frequencies, dispersion relations; Antennas: antenna types, radiation pattern, gain and directivity, return loss, antenna arrays; Basics of radar; Light propagation in optical fibers.

Electrical Engineering

Section 1: Engineering Mathematics

Linear Algebra: Matrix Algebra, Systems of linear equations, Eigen values, Eigen vectors. Calculus: Mean value theorems, Theorems of integral calculus, Evaluation of definite and improper integrals, Partial Derivatives, Maxima and minima, Multiple integrals, Fourier series, Vector identities, Directional derivatives, Line integral, Surface integral, Volume integral, Stokes’s theorem, Gauss’s theorem, Green’s theorem. Differential equations: First order equations (linear and nonlinear), Higher order linear differential equations with constant coefficients, Method of variation of parameters, Cauchy’s equation, Euler’s equation, Initial and boundary value problems, Partial Differential Equations, Method of separation of variables. Complex variables: Analytic functions, Cauchy’s integral theorem, Cauchy’s integral formula, Taylor series, Laurent series, Residue theorem, Solution integrals. Probability and Statistics: Sampling theorems, Conditional probability, Mean, Median, Mode, Standard Deviation, Random variables, Discrete and Continuous distributions, Poisson distribution, Normal distribution, Binomial distribution, Correlation analysis, Regression analysis. Numerical Methods: Solutions of nonlinear algebraic equations, Single and Multi‐step methods for differential equations. Transform Theory: Fourier Transform, Laplace Transform, z‐Transform.

Electrical Engineering

Section 2: Electric Circuits Network graph, KCL, KVL, Node and Mesh analysis, Transient response of dc and ac networks, Sinusoidal steady‐state analysis, Resonance, Passive filters, Ideal current and voltage sources, Thevenin’s theorem, Norton’s theorem, Superposition theorem, Maximum power transfer theorem, Two‐port networks, Three phase circuits, Power and power factor in ac circuits.

Section 3: Electromagnetic Fields Coulomb's Law, Electric Field Intensity, Electric Flux Density, Gauss's Law, Divergence, Electric field and potential due to point, line, plane and spherical charge distributions, Effect of dielectric medium, Capacitance of simple configurations, Biot‐Savart’s law, Ampere’s law, Curl, Faraday’s law, Lorentz force, Inductance, Magnetomotive force, Reluctance, Magnetic circuits,Self and Mutual inductance of simple configurations.

Section 4: Signals and Systems Representation of continuous and discrete‐time signals, Shifting and scaling operations, Linear Time Invariant and Causal systems, Fourier series representation of continuous periodic signals, Sampling theorem, Applications of Fourier Transform, Laplace Transform and z-Transform.

Section 5: Electrical Machines Single phase transformer: equivalent circuit, phasor diagram, open circuit and short circuit tests, regulation and efficiency; Three phase transformers: connections, parallel operation; Auto‐transformer, Electromechanical energy conversion principles, DC machines: separately excited, series and shunt, motoring and generating mode of operation and their characteristics, starting and speed control of dc motors; Three phase induction motors: principle of operation, types, performance, torque-speed characteristics, no-load and blocked rotor tests, equivalent circuit, starting and speed control; Operating principle of single phase induction motors; Synchronous machines: cylindrical and salient pole machines, performance, regulation and parallel operation of generators, starting of synchronous motor, characteristics; Types of losses and efficiency calculations of electric machines.

Section 6: Power Systems Power generation concepts, ac and dc transmission concepts, Models and performance of transmission lines and cables, Series and shunt compensation, Electric field distribution and insulators, Distribution systems, Per‐unit quantities, Bus admittance matrix, GaussSeidel and Newton-Raphson load flow methods, Voltage and Frequency control, Power factor correction, Symmetrical components, Symmetrical and unsymmetrical fault analysis, Principles of over‐current, differential and distance protection; Circuit breakers, System stability concepts, Equal area criterion.

Section 7: Control Systems Mathematical modeling and representation of systems, Feedback principle, transfer function, Block diagrams and Signal flow graphs, Transient and Steady‐state analysis of linear time invariant systems, Routh-Hurwitz and Nyquist criteria, Bode plots, Root loci, Stability analysis, Lag, Lead and Lead‐Lag compensators; P, PI and PID controllers; State space model, State transition matrix.

Section 8: Electrical and Electronic Measurements Bridges and Potentiometers, Measurement of voltage, current, power, energy and power factor; Instrument transformers, Digital voltmeters and multimeters, Phase, Time and Frequency measurement; Oscilloscopes, Error analysis.

Section 9: Analog and Digital Electronics Characteristics of diodes, BJT, MOSFET; Simple diode circuits: clipping, clamping, rectifiers; Amplifiers: Biasing, Equivalent circuit and Frequency response; Oscillators and Feedback amplifiers; Operational amplifiers: Characteristics and applications; Simple active filters, VCOs and Timers, Combinational and Sequential logic circuits, Multiplexer, Demultiplexer, Schmitt trigger, Sample and hold circuits, A/D and D/A converters, 8085Microprocessor: Architecture, Programming and Interfacing.

Section 10: Power Electronics Characteristics of semiconductor power devices: Diode, Thyristor, Triac, GTO, MOSFET, IGBT; DC to DC conversion: Buck, Boost and Buck-Boost converters; Single and three phase configuration of uncontrolled rectifiers, Line commutated thyristor based converters, Bidirectional ac to dc voltage source converters, Issues of line current harmonics, Power factor, Distortion factor of ac to dc converters, Single phase and three phase inverters, Sinusoidal pulse width modulation.

Mechanical Engineering

Section 1: Engineering Mathematics Linear Algebra: Matrix algebra, systems of linear equations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Calculus: Functions of single variable, limit, continuity and differentiability, mean value theorems, indeterminate forms; evaluation of definite and improper integrals; double and triple integrals; partial derivatives, total derivative, Taylor series (in one and two variables), maxima and minima, Fourier series; gradient, divergence and curl, vector identities, directional derivatives, line, surface and volume integrals, applications of Gauss, Stokes and Green’s theorems. Differential equations: First order equations (linear and nonlinear); higher order linear differential equations with constant coefficients; Euler-Cauchy equation; initial and boundary value problems; Laplace transforms; solutions of heat, wave and Laplace's equations. Complex variables: Analytic functions; Cauchy-Riemann equations; Cauchy’s integral theorem and integral formula; Taylor and Laurent series. Probability and Statistics: Definitions of probability, sampling theorems, conditional probability; mean, median, mode and standard deviation; random variables, binomial, Poisson and normal distributions. Numerical Methods: Numerical solutions of linear and non-linear algebraic equations; integration by trapezoidal and Simpson’s rules; single and multi-step methods for differential equations.

Section 2: Applied Mechanics and Design Engineering Mechanics: Free-body diagrams and equilibrium; trusses and frames; virtual work; kinematics and dynamics of particles and of rigid bodies in plane motion; impulse and momentum (linear and angular) and energy formulations, collisions. Mechanics of Materials: Stress and strain, elastic constants, Poisson's ratio; Mohr’s circle for plane stress and plane strain; thin cylinders; shear force and bending moment diagrams; bending and shear stresses; deflection of beams; torsion of circular shafts; Euler’s theory of columns; energy methods; thermal stresses; strain gauges and rosettes; testing of materials with universal testing machine; testing of hardness and impact strength. Theory of Machines: Displacement, velocity and acceleration analysis of plane mechanisms; dynamic analysis of linkages; cams; gears and gear trains; flywheels and governors; balancing of reciprocating and rotating masses; gyroscope. Vibrations: Free and forced vibration of single degree of freedom systems, effect of damping; vibration isolation; resonance; critical speeds of shafts. Machine Design: Design for static and dynamic loading; failure theories; fatigue strength and the S-N diagram; principles of the design of machine elements such as bolted, riveted and welded joints; shafts, gears, rolling and sliding contact bearings, brakes and clutches, springs.

Section 3: Fluid Mechanics and Thermal Sciences Fluid Mechanics: Fluid properties; fluid statics, manometry, buoyancy, forces on submerged bodies, stability of floating bodies; control-volume analysis of mass, momentum and energy; fluid acceleration; differential equations of continuity and momentum; Bernoulli’s equation; dimensional analysis; viscous flow of incompressible fluids, boundary layer, elementary turbulent flow, flow through pipes, head losses in pipes, bends and fittings. Heat-Transfer: Modes of heat transfer; one dimensional heat conduction, resistance concept and electrical analogy, heat transfer through fins; unsteady heat conduction, lumped parameter system, Heisler's charts; thermal boundary layer, dimensionless parameters in free and forced convective heat transfer, heat transfer correlations for flow over flat plates and through pipes, effect of turbulence; heat exchanger performance, LMTD and NTU methods; radiative heat transfer, StefanBoltzmann law, Wien's displacement law, black and grey surfaces, view factors, radiation network analysis. Thermodynamics: Thermodynamic systems and processes; properties of pure substances, behaviour of ideal and real gases; zeroth and first laws of thermodynamics, calculation of work and heat in various processes; second law of thermodynamics; thermodynamic property charts and tables, availability and irreversibility; thermodynamic relations. Applications: Power Engineering: Air and gas compressors; vapour and gas power cycles, concepts of regeneration and reheat. I.C. Engines: Air-standard Otto, Diesel and dual cycles. Refrigeration and air-conditioning: Vapour and gas refrigeration and heat pump cycles; properties of moist air, psychrometric chart, basic psychrometric processes. Turbomachinery: Impulse and reaction principles, velocity diagrams, Pelton-wheel, Francis and Kaplan turbines.

Section 4: Materials, Manufacturing and Industrial Engineering Engineering Materials: Structure and properties of engineering materials, phase diagrams, heat treatment, stress-strain diagrams for engineering materials. Casting, Forming and Joining Processes: Different types of castings, design of patterns, moulds and cores; solidification and cooling; riser and gating design. Plastic deformation and yield criteria; fundamentals of hot and cold working processes; load estimation for bulk (forging, rolling, extrusion, drawing) and sheet (shearing, deep drawing, bending) metal forming processes; principles of powder metallurgy. Principles of welding, brazing, soldering and adhesive bonding. Machining and Machine Tool Operations: Mechanics of machining; basic machine tools; single and multi-point cutting tools, tool geometry and materials, tool life and wear; economics of machining; principles of non-traditional machining processes; principles of work holding, design of jigs and fixtures. Metrology and Inspection: Limits, fits and tolerances; linear and angular measurements; comparators; gauge design; interferometry; form and finish measurement; alignment and testing methods; tolerance analysis in manufacturing and assembly. Computer Integrated Manufacturing: Basic concepts of CAD/CAM and their integration tools. Production Planning and Control: Forecasting models, aggregate production planning, scheduling, materials requirement planning. Inventory Control: Deterministic models; safety stock inventory control systems. Operations Research: Linear programming, simplex method, transportation, assignment, network flow models, simple queuing models, PERT and CPM.

Computer Science and Information Technology

Section1: Engineering Mathematics Discrete Mathematics: Propositional and first order logic. Sets, relations, functions, partial orders and lattices. Groups. Graphs: connectivity, matching, coloring. Combinatorics: counting, recurrence relations, generating functions. Linear Algebra: Matrices, determinants, system of linear equations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, LU decomposition. Calculus: Limits, continuity and differentiability. Maxima and minima. Mean value theorem. Integration. Probability: Random variables. Uniform, normal, exponential, poisson and binomial distributions. Mean, median, mode and standard deviation. Conditional probability and Bayes theorem. Computer Science and Information Technology

Section 2: Digital Logic Boolean algebra. Combinational and sequential circuits. Minimization. Number representations and computer arithmetic (fixed and floating point).

Section 3: Computer Organization and Architecture Machine instructions and addressing modes. ALU, data‐path and control unit. Instruction pipelining. Memory hierarchy: cache, main memory and secondary storage; I/O interface (interrupt and DMA mode).

Section 4: Programming and Data Structures Programming in C. Recursion. Arrays, stacks, queues, linked lists, trees, binary search trees, binary heaps, graphs.

Section 5: Algorithms Searching, sorting, hashing. Asymptotic worst case time and space complexity. Algorithm design techniques: greedy, dynamic programming and divide‐and‐conquer. Graph search, minimum spanning trees, shortest paths.

Section 6: Theory of Computation Regular expressions and finite automata. Context-free grammars and push-down automata. Regular and contex-free languages, pumping lemma. Turing machines and undecidability.

Section 7: Compiler Design Lexical analysis, parsing, syntax-directed translation. Runtime environments. Intermediate code generation.

Section 8: Operating System Processes, threads, inter‐process communication, concurrency and synchronization. Deadlock. CPU scheduling. Memory management and virtual memory. File systems.

Section 9: Databases ER‐model. Relational model: relational algebra, tuple calculus, SQL. Integrity constraints, normal forms. File organization, indexing (e.g., B and B+ trees). Transactions and concurrency control.

Section 10: Computer Networks Concept of layering. LAN technologies (Ethernet). Flow and error control techniques, switching. IPv4/IPv6, routers and routing algorithms (distance vector, link state). TCP/UDP and sockets, congestion control. Application layer protocols (DNS, SMTP, POP, FTP, HTTP). Basics of Wi-Fi. Network security: authentication, basics of public key and private key cryptography, digital signatures and certificates, firewalls.

Syllabus for General Aptitude (GA)

(COMMON TO ALL PAPERS)

Verbal Ability: English grammar, sentence completion, verbal analogies, word groups, instructions, critical reasoning and verbal deduction.

Numerical Ability: Numerical computation, numerical estimation, numerical reasoning and data interpretation.

Sample Questions: Verbal Ability

Q.1. Choose the appropriate answer to complete the following sentence:

To those of us who had always thought him timid, his --------- came as a surprise.

(A) Intrepidity (B) inevitability (C) inability (D) inertness

Ans. (A)

Q.2. Choose the appropriate answer to complete the following sentence:

Medicine is to illness as law is to _________

(A) discipline (B) anarchy (C) treason (D) etiquette

Ans. (B)

Q.3. Read the following paragraph :

“The ordinary form of mercury thermometer is used for temperature ranging from –40o F to 500o F. For measuring temperature below –40o F, thermometers filled with alcohol are used. These are, however, not satisfactory for use in high temperatures. When a mercury thermometer is used for temperature above 500o F, the space above the mercury is filled with some inert gas, usually nitrogen or carbon dioxide, placed in the thermometer under pressure. As the mercury rises, the gas pressures is increased, so that it is possible to use these thermometers for temperatures as high as 1000o F.”

With what, besides mercury, would a thermometer be filled if it was designed to be used for measuring temperature of about 500o F?

(A) Pyrometer (B) Inert gas (C) Iron and brass (D) Gas

Ans. (B)

Q.4. The cost of manufacturing tractors in Korea is twenty percent less than the cost of manufacturing tractors in Germany. Even after transportation fees and import taxes are added, it is still cheaper to import tractors from Korea to Germany than to produce tractors in Germany.

Which of the following assertions is best supported by the above information?

(A) Labour costs in Korea are twenty percent below those in Germany.

(B) Importing tractors into Germany will eliminate twenty percent of the manufacturing jobs in Germany.

(C) The costs of transporting a tractor from Korea to Germany is more than twenty percent ofthe cost of manufacturing the tractor in Korea.

(D) The import taxes on a tractor imported from Korea to Germanyis less than twenty percentof the cost of manufacturing the tractor in Germany.

Ans. (D)

Numerical Ability

Q.5. In a survey, 3/16 of the people surveyed told that they preferred to use publictransport while commuting daily to office. 5/8 of the people surveyed told that theypreferred to use their own vehicles. The remaining 75 respondents said thatthey had no clear preference. How many people preferred to use publictransport?

(A) 75 (B) 100 (C) 125 (D) 133

Ans. (A)

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Notifications and Cut Offs for GATE 2016

GATE  Online Application Processing System (GOAPS) Website Opens for Enrollment, Application Filling, Application Submission

September 1, 2015 (Tuesday)

Last Date for Submission of Online Application through Website

October 8, 2015 (Thursday)

Last Date for Request for Change in the Choice of Examination City via GOAPS login

 November 20, 2015 (Friday)

Availability of Admit Card on the Online Application Interface for printing

December 29, 2015 (Tuesday)

GATE 2016 Online Examination

  • Forenoon: 9.00 AM to 12.00 Noon
  • Afternoon: 2.00 PM to 5.00 PM
  • (On Saturdays and Sundays only)

January 30 to February 07, 2016

Announcement of Results on the Online Application Website

March 19, 2016 (Saturday)

Stream and category wise qualifying cut-off for GATE – 2015

GATE Paper Code

No of Candidates Appeared

GATE Paper

Qualifying Marks (General)

Qualifying Marks (OBCNCL)

Qualifying Marks (SC/ST/PwD)

EC

172714

Electronics and Communication

25

22.5

16.67

CS

115425

Computer Science and IT

25

22.5

16.67

ME

22,367

Mechanical Engineering

32.73

29.46

21.82

EE

125851

Electrical Engineering

25

22.5

16.67

IN

185758

Instrumentation Engineering

25.45

22.9

16.96

CE

101429

Civil Engineering

25

22.5

16.67

CH

15,844

Chemical Engineering

27.52

24.77

18.34

BT

10,719

Biotechnology

26.08

23.47

17.39

Stream and category wise qualifying cut-off for GATE – 2014

GATE Paper Code

GATE Paper

No of Candidates Appeared

Qualifying Marks (General)

Qualifying Marks (OBCNCL)

Qualifying Marks (SC/ST/PwD)

CS

Computer Science and IT

1,5,5190

25

22.5

16.67

EC

Electronics and
Communications Engineeri

2,16,367

25.56

23.01

17.04

EE

Electrical Engineering

1,41,799

25

22.5

16.67

ME

Mechanical Engineering

1,85,578

28.86

25.97

19.24

IN

Instrumentation Engineering

22,367

25

22.5

16.67

CE

Civil Engineering

90,872

26.57

23.91

17.71

CH

Chemical Engineering

15,844

35.14

31.62

23.43

BT

Biotechnology

10,719

25.84

23.26

17.23

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Tips and Strategy for GATE

The ideal timing for preparation of GATE Exam is your final year of engineering or degree. Appearing for GATE has different reasons for different students. Students from private engineering colleges try to get into M.Tech in order to have stamp of the better known institutions and for them reasonable percentile serves the purpose. On the other hand, students studying in well established institutes may aim to get into IIT or other equivalent institutions. For them very high percentile is essential.

By this, we mean a candidate should be thorough about each and every subject that of study during the graduation course - the concepts should be clear and no topics should be left out. Remember, it is tough exam and preparation has to be 100 percent. However many topper feels that after your degree 3-4 months hard labor is sufficient to crack this exam. It is because GATE Exam doesn’t look for any syllabus completion from the candidate. A good understanding of the basic concepts and their application is required. By understanding, it is implied that candidate is not supposed to just be able to mug up & explain but rather this exam needs candidate to have a feel/common sense. So here common sense means that while solving any problem in GATE Exam, solution takes more than 8 steps, u must re-look at the approach. (Generally GATE problems are not lengthy).

The very first step to start the preparation for GATE is to collect the overall syllabus of this exam. Always try to be specific about your books for fundamental concepts, and guide books for GATE. Also check out the previous year paper which will tell you about your strength and where you are lacking. Try to solve as many problems from different types of books. Practice always gives the extra edge to candidate. Following are some of the important tips for GATE preparation:

1. While solving the problem, students must have balance between speed & accuracy.

2. Preparation time for GATE is subjective and depends on the so many factors such as individual aptitude, fundamentals, attitude, concentration level etc., typically, a rigorous preparation of 4-6 months is considered good enough for getting into IISc or IITs.

3. Keep a check on your performance; it is compulsory to directly jump upon the previous GATE question on the topic you just finished. You can try to solve some examples in model papers also.

4. Any problem can be tackled in number of ways. So being innovative and intuitive also helps to reach the correct option quickly. This means, it is not at all compulsory to solve question in typical way. Practice comes handy to solve questions quicker so that the balance time can be utilized in some really thought provoking questions (all few questions fall in this category).

5. You should have done sufficient study/ discussion, so that the moment you start reading the question you should have an intuition on whether you can solve it. One way, is to read multiple books on the same subjects, especially for subjects of your interest or the thrust portion in GATE exam pattern. Also, to support your study with some self notes is good idea. This helps in final revisions.

6. While preparing always keep your goal in thought and fancy being in the place like top institutes wherever you want to have admission. Always remember you can get, if you really want. So positive mind is the key. Mild tension can be helpful to have kind of motivation or a sense of duty. But you should avoid thoughts of loosing which can cause loss of concentration and low performance. Read only when you are reading.

7. In the last days of preparation, if you have any doubts about any topic/formula, you can have a look on these sections. Always remember, more doubts lead to more concept building.

Always give your best while studying. Study hard and sleep tight is formula. So day before exam take 8-10 hr sleeps. It will refresh your mind and you will feel comfort in exam hall.

 

 

Gate Exam Pattern, Tips and Cutoffs: Click Here

 

GATE 2017 Latest Information, Important Dates, Eligibility

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