UPSC aspirants can now give interview in Indian Languages

The Union Public Service Commission (UPSC) in an important affidavit to Bombay High Court said that the Civil Services Exam aspirants can now give interviews in English, Hindi, or any Indian Language of their choice

Created On: Jul 15, 2011 07:16 IST
Modified On: May 6, 2013 12:23 IST

The Union Public Service Commission (UPSC) in an important affidavit to Bombay High Court said that the Civil Services Exam aspirants can now give interviews in English, Hindi, or any Indian Language of their choice. This applies to candidates who opt for an Indian Language medium– other than Hindi– for the written Civil Services exam.

UPSC submitted the affidavit to the Bombay High Court in response to the PIL filed by IAS aspirant Chittaranjan Kumar. The IAS apirant challenged the existing rule that requires a candidate to give the interview in English, if he had appeared for the main examination in that language.

The recommendations have been suggested by an expert committee formed by UPSC to look into the issue and have been accepted by UPSC. The court was told that these suggestions have been forwarded to the Government with a request to send comments or observations. After hearing from the government, UPSC will incorporate necessary changes and implement them.

Chittaranjan Kumar, who appeared for the written part of the 2008 Civil Services examination in English, wanted to give the interview in Hindi. The PIL contended that the rule was pro-rich and anti-poor. It said the interviewers should judge a candidate on the basis of his or her personality and not on the basis of speaking English.

The PIL argued that if the existing rule is changed, the candidates appearing for Civil Services examination shall get an opportunity to speak in their own language in which they feel comfortable at the time of interview and thus score more marks in the verbal test.
This way, students from the grassroots level will grab more seats by securing higher rank and break the tradition of elites getting into the civil service, the PIL argued.