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Music in Modern era

Modernism in music is characterized by a desire for or belief in science, nature, intelligence, anti-romanticism, and other forward thinking.
Aug 7, 2012 13:25 IST
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Music Modern era
In music, the term "modernism" refers generally to the significant departures in musical language that occurred at or around the beginning of the 20th century, creating new understandings of harmonic, melodic, sonic, and rhythmic aspects of music. The operative word most associated with it is "innovation".
Hindustani classical music was imparted on a one-on-one basis through the guru-shishya ("mentor-protégé") tradition. This system had many benefits, but also several drawbacks; in many cases, the shishya had to spend most of his time serving his guru with a hope that the guru might teach him a "cheez" (piece or nuance) or two. In addition, the system forced the music to be limited to a small subsection of the Indian community. To a large extent it was limited to the palaces and dance halls. It was shunned by the intellectuals, avoided by the educated middle class, and in general looked down upon as a frivolous practice.
MODERN MUSIC PERIOD
Modernism in music is characterized by a desire for or belief in science, nature, intelligence, anti-romanticism, and other forward thinking. Modern music is also known as 20th Century Music. It has been one of great changes. For example, science, technology and our growing understanding of the world around us have inspired people to write music that reflects what they see in the world around them, and how they feel about what they see.
During the Modern period, art experimented with new forms, techniques, and styles . Music composers did the same thing. They explored different ways to produce sound. Rhythmic patterns became much freer, often changing frequently in a piece. Melody was becoming more dissonant--harsher--moving by leaps rather than steps. Harmony was also becoming more dissonant. Polytonality--the playing together of two keys at once was occurring more frequently. Battle lines were drawn between tonal and atonal music.
Hindustani Classical Music in Modern India
Hindustani Classical Music in Modern India is an important part of the cultural landscape of Northern India. The tradition of Indian Music has developed simultaneously in two cultures. One is in the north, covering the entire region of Dwarka to Manipur and Srinagar to Belgaon, and the other is in the south, prevalent in Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Tamil Nadu and Kerala. Both of these streams of music developed almost parallel melodic practices, in sync with the common musical heritage and common musical ideals, similar to the language structure in the North anSouth.
Music in Modern era

In music, the term "modernism" refers generally to the significant departures in musical language that occurred at or around the beginning of the 20th century, creating new understandings of harmonic, melodic, sonic, and rhythmic aspects of music. The operative word most associated with it is "innovation".

Hindustani classical music was imparted on a one-on-one basis through the guru-shishya ("mentor-protégé") tradition. This system had many benefits, but also several drawbacks; in many cases, the shishya had to spend most of his time serving his guru with a hope that the guru might teach him a "cheez" (piece or nuance) or two. In addition, the system forced the music to be limited to a small subsection of the Indian community. To a large extent it was limited to the palaces and dance halls. It was shunned by the intellectuals, avoided by the educated middle class, and in general looked down upon as a frivolous practice.

Modern Music Period

Modernism in music is characterized by a desire for or belief in science, nature, intelligence, anti-romanticism, and other forward thinking. Modern music is also known as 20th Century Music. It has been one of great changes. For example, science, technology and our growing understanding of the world around us have inspired people to write music that reflects what they see in the world around them, and how they feel about what they see.

During the Modern period, art experimented with new forms, techniques, and styles . Music composers did the same thing. They explored different ways to produce sound. Rhythmic patterns became much freer, often changing frequently in a piece. Melody was becoming more dissonant--harsher--moving by leaps rather than steps. Harmony was also becoming more dissonant. Polytonality--the playing together of two keys at once was occurring more frequently. Battle lines were drawn between tonal and atonal music.

Hindustani Classical Music in Modern India

Hindustani Classical Music in Modern India is an important part of the cultural landscape of Northern India. The tradition of Indian Music has developed simultaneously in two cultures. One is in the north, covering the entire region of Dwarka to Manipur and Srinagar to Belgaon, and the other is in the south, prevalent in Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Tamil Nadu and Kerala. Both of these streams of music developed almost parallel melodic practices, in sync with the common musical heritage and common musical ideals, similar to the language structure in the North and South.